Innovation

Thermoelectric Sensor

University Court of The University of Glasgow
posted on 02/15/2012

The Thermoelectric Sensor technology is a Nano-Calorimetric Sensor which measures very small changes in temeprature. The IP provides a route to making the most sensitive calorimetric measurements (with a resolution of (0.1 mK).

Suggested Uses

•Array formats for high throughput drug discovery/compound analysis •Measurement of drug interactions with proteins, ligands or receptors •Protein crystallisation studies •Clinical diagnostics •Environmental diagnostics •Gas sensing •Molecular biology – PCR amplification

Advantages

•Faster assays allowing real-time measurements of thermal changes in biological samples •96 well high throughput format compatible with existing HTS equipment – higher multiples 384, 864 and 1536 plate formats may also be used •Application with a wide range of biological samples including single cells, small groups of cells, tissue samples, cell-free extracts , cell organelles or isolated biochemical materials such as enzymes or components of biochemical pathways •Easy manufacture using known methods adapted from the semiconductor industry

Innovation Details
 

Detailed Description

Changes in temperature can be a good way to measure a chemical or biological activity, providing both real-time (kinetic) or end-point (steady-state) information. There are numerous examples of the use of this method, termed calorimetry, in use throughout analytical sciences and biotechnology. There are a number of reactions where very small amounts of heat are produced (or consumed). This might be because the sample is very small, or because the reaction itself does not result in a large energy change. The Thermoelectric Sensor technology is a Nano-Calorimetric Sensor which measures very small changes in temperature. The IP provides a route to making the most sensitive calorimetric measurements (with a resolution of (0.1 mK). It is also ideally suited to analysis of small samples, associated with Lab-on-a-Chip methods. Existing thermal assays are not of sufficient sensitivity and nor are they available in appropriate formats (e.g. High Throughput Formats) to enable the rapid detection of small changes of thermal energy in biological samples.

File Number: 09 


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This innovation currently is not available for online licensing. Please contact Louise O'Neill at University Court of The University of Glasgow for more information.

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Louise O'Neill Louise O'Neill

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